Checklist: What to Look for in an Open House

 

Open Houses are a great way to casually view a home, and given that they are (typically) beautifully staged, it can be easy to get wrapped up in the beauty of the home rather than focus on the state and quality of the home.  Here's a checklist of common things that you should be looking at when you go to an Open House, or go to a showing for any home, really.

 

 

Electrical Outlets

 

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    • Take your time walking through the rooms, and pay close attention to how many outlets each room has.  Use your current home as a point of reference as to whether or not you would need more outlets than this home has.  Adding outlets is possible, should you choose to Buy the home and find this a good option, but it is a big project that you should be okay with going into.  

 

Windows

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    • As you walk through the rooms, pay attention to the placement and view from the windows.  The more natural light flowing into a home, the better.  Are the windows situated in such a way that they would allow for a lot of light to pour into the home?  When you look out the windows, are you met by a lovely view of your neighborhood, or are you met with a view into the neighbor's home through their window?  These are things that will make a big difference in your every day life in the home.

Floors

 

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    • One thing you can do during the Open House is check the state of the floors.  Bring along a marble and set it on the floor of every room you walk into.  Does it move around and find low spots?  In older homes, a slightly off-level floor is somewhat expected, but a lumpy or unlevel floor can also be a warning sign of bigger issues in the house.  It's better to become aware of those issues before you move in.
    • Check the physical state of the flooring by peeking under rugs for signs of damage.  It's true, also, that the couch in the living room could be strategically placed over a big stain on the carpet or hardwood floors, but it's also possible that the area rug is hiding something, as well.  And, let's face it, it'd be a lot easier to lift the rug up to check for damage underneath than it would be to do the same under the couch.

 

Under Sinks

 

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    • Check in the cabinets under the sinks both in the kitchen and in any bathrooms.  Check for any signs of water damage that may have been caused by a leaky pipe or problem with the plumbing.  If you see a sign of damage, you will open up an opportunity to have your real estate agent check with the sellers to see what issues there have been with the plumbing, when they were remedied, and if there are any other issues that may arise. 

 

Appliances

 

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    • If any appliances are included in the sale of the house, check them while you are there.  Are they in good condition?  Try turning on the stove or oven to make sure that it seems to be in working condition.

 

Attic

 

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    • If the home has an attic, even if it is hard to get to, it's not a bad idea to take a peek inside.  For one thing, you can check for signs of pest infestation that can sometimes occur in attics.  For another, you can check to see how well the insulation is.  A well insulated attic makes a huge difference to the cost of utilities in Summer and Winter.

Outside the Home

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    • Check for any signs of cracking or separating on the bricks or foundation, because no one wants to have to deal with a home's cracking foundation.
    • Look at the gutters: Are they positioned in such a way that the drainage runs away from the home?  Exposure to water run-off from improper gutter installation can make for big issues with the home's foundation in the future.
Remember, the best way to prepare for the home-buying proccess is to hire a great real estate agent to help you along the way.  Buying a home is both exciting and terrifying, and having someone on your side who knows the ins and outs of the industry can lead to a huge weight being lifted off your shoulders.  You can call The Linda Frierdich Group - Century 21 Advantage any time to speak with someone about buying a home.